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Ref.: CPT/Inf (2000) 13 [EN] - Publication Date: 18 August 2000


10th General Report on the CPT's activities
covering the period 1 January to 31 December 1999

The CPT is required to draw up every year a general report on its activities, which is published. This 10th General Report, as well as previous general reports and other information about the work of the CPT, may be obtained from the Committee's Secretariat.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface

ACTIVITIES IN 1999

A milestone year for the CPT

Visits

Meetings

Publications

Cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)

ORGANISATIONAL ISSUES

The Convention and its Protocols

CPT membership

Administrative and financial questions

WOMEN DEPRIVED OF THEIR LIBERTY

Preliminary remarks

Mixed gender staffing

Separate accommodation for women deprived of their liberty

Equality of access to activities

Ante natal and post natal care

Hygiene and health issues

APPENDIX 1

A.      Signatures and ratifications of the European Convention for the Prevention
of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

B.      The CPT's field of operations

C.      Signatures and ratifications of Protocols Nos. 1 and 2 to the European Convention
for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

APPENDIX 2

State-by-State table showing the number of visits by the CPT,
visit reports sent to Governments and reports published

APPENDIX 3

A.      Members of the CPT

B.      Secretariat of the CPT

APPENDIX 4

Places of detention visited by CPT delegations in 1999


Preface

                The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) was set up under the 1987 Council of Europe Convention of the same name (hereinafter "the Convention"). According to Article 1 of the Convention:

                "There shall be established a European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment..... The Committee shall, by means of visits, examine the treatment of persons deprived of their liberty with a view to strengthening, if necessary, the protection of such persons from torture and from inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment."

                The work of the CPT is designed to be an integrated part of the Council of Europe system for the protection of human rights, placing a proactive non-judicial mechanism alongside the existing reactive judicial mechanism of the European Court of Human Rights.

                The CPT implements its essentially preventive function through two kinds of visits - periodic and ad hoc. Periodic visits are carried out to all Parties to the Convention on a regular basis. Ad hoc visits are organised in these States when they appear to the Committee "to be required in the circumstances".

                When carrying out a visit, the CPT enjoys extensive powers under the Convention: access to the territory of the State concerned and the right to travel without restriction; unlimited access to any place where persons are deprived of their liberty, including the right to move inside such places without restriction; access to full information on places where persons deprived of their liberty are being held, as well as to other information available to the State which is necessary for the Committee to carry out its task.

                The Committee is also entitled to interview in private persons deprived of their liberty and to communicate freely with anyone whom it believes can supply relevant information.

                Visits may be carried out to any place "where persons are deprived of their liberty by a public authority". The CPT's mandate thus extends beyond prisons and police stations to encompass psychiatric institutions, detention areas at military barracks, holding centres for asylum seekers or other categories of foreigners, and places in which young persons may be deprived of their liberty by judicial or administrative order.

                Two fundamental principles govern relations between the CPT and the Parties to the Convention - co-operation and confidentiality. In this respect, it should be emphasised that the role of the Committee is not to condemn States, but rather to assist them to prevent the ill-treatment of persons deprived of their liberty.

                After each visit, the CPT draws up a report which sets out its findings and includes, if necessary, recommendations and other advice, on the basis of which a dialogue is developed with the State concerned. The Committee's visit report is, in principle, confidential; however, almost all States have chosen to waive the rule of confidentiality and publish the report.


ACTIVITIES IN 1999

A milestone year for the CPT

1.             1999 was a milestone year for the CPT.  It marked the 10th anniversary both of the entry into force (on 2 February 1989) of the Convention which provides for the establishment of the CPT and of the Committee’s actual existence (the inaugural meeting having taken place from 13 to 16 November 1989).[1]

                The CPT felt that this two-fold anniversary offered an appropriate moment to take stock of the Committee’s work to date and to reflect upon the challenges which lie ahead.  For this purpose, the CPT organised an event in Strasbourg on 19 November 1999 entitled "The Prevention of Torture at the Dawn of a New Millenium".  The 300 participants included many leading anti-torture campaigners from the Council of Europe’s member countries and beyond, as well as government representatives and members of intergovernmental organisations working towards the prevention of torture and ill-treatment.  Keynote speeches were given by the Russian politician and human rights activist Sergei Kovalyev and the President of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Cornelio Sommaruga.  Other principal speakers included Robert Badinter (former Minister of Justice of France), the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights, Alvaro Gil-Robles, and the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, Sir Nigel Rodley.

2.             The overall assessment of the CPT’s work during the previous ten years was positive.  However, many ideas were mooted concerning ways in which the CPT could further improve its operating methods and develop its activities.  These ideas are currently under consideration by the Committee, which is carrying out a comprehensive review of all aspects of its working methods.

                One recurring theme was the need for greater synergy between the CPT and non-governmental organisations operating at local level.  It was felt that this would be particularly beneficial as regards the process of monitoring the implementation by States of the Committee’s recommendations. 

                Many participants considered that short and very targeted visits should have a larger place in the CPT’s programme, which currently is dominated by lengthy visits of a periodic nature covering a range of issues.  In this connection, the need to enhance the CPT’s rapid-reaction capacity was emphasised.  Various types of places of deprivation of liberty which to date have been somewhat neglected by the CPT were also highlighted ; particular reference was made to military detention facilities and "homes" for the aged.

                The need for the CPT’s visit reports to be better known in the States concerned was also emphasised.  In many countries, detailed knowledge of the reports tended to be restricted to ministerial authorities.  Not even the institutions visited by the CPT were always properly informed of the Committee’s findings.  It was felt that this problem would be largely overcome if funds could be found to translate CPT reports into the languages of States visited. 

                A number of participants considered that the CPT should seek to develop the "assistance" aspect of its activities.  Many States wholeheartedly agreed with the Committee’s recommendations, but argued - quite convincingly - that implementation of those recommendations was beyond their current means.  One possibility would be to develop channels through which certain of the CPT’s recommendations with substantial financial implications, in particular those relating to a country’s infrastructure, could be submitted for consideration to other international organisations which may have the necessary funds at their disposal.  Another approach might be to set up, within the framework of the Council of Europe, a special fund to assist States to implement the CPT’s recommendations ; the resources of such a fund could come from both governmental and non-governmental sources.

                Reference was also made to Protocol No. 1 to the Convention, which should soon enter into force and will "open" the Convention to accession by non-member States of the Council of Europe (cf. also paragraphs 15 and 16).  The extension of the CPT’s activities beyond the framework of the Council of Europe was seen as an exciting prospect ; however, potential pitfalls were also highlighted.  Would not such a development risk placing an undue burden on the Committee’s already stretched resources?  Further, concern was expressed that a considerable extension of the CPT’s activities beyond the European continent could complicate current efforts to establish a world-wide system of visits to places of deprivation of liberty.

Visits

3.             The CPT organised 16 visits totalling some 150 days during 1999, an increase of around 20 days as compared to 1998.  A complete list of the countries and places of detention visited by CPT delegations in 1999 is set out in Appendix 4.

4.             The CPT carried out 11 periodic visits : to Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Norway, Portugal, Romania, the Russian Federation, San Marino, and the United Kingdom (Northern Ireland).  This was the first time the CPT had visited Latvia, Northern Ireland, Romania, and the Russian Federation on a periodic basis.  Bulgaria, Hungary, Liechtenstein, Norway and San Marino received their second periodic visit from the Committee, and Austria and Portugal, their third.

                In previous annual reports, the CPT has indicated that, in the interests of maintaining the momentum for change, the average period between periodic visits to a given country should not exceed four years.  Unfortunately, due to inadequate resources, the Committee is not at present able to meet this objective in many cases.  In 1999, it was only met with respect to Bulgaria and Portugal; the gap between the periodic visits to Austria and Hungary was five years, to Liechtenstein and Norway - six years, and to San Marino - seven years.

5.             Five ad hoc visits were organised, to Estonia, Greece, the Netherlands Antilles, Turkey and Ukraine.

                The January 1999 ad hoc visit to the Netherlands Antilles deserves to be highlighted, as it was organised following an invitation from the Netherlands authorities.  This was only the second example of a CPT visit being carried out at the request of a State, a somewhat surprising fact given that a number of situations can be imagined in which such an approach could prove useful to a government.  The Committee was requested to review on the spot the action which had been taken to improve the situation at Koraal Specht Prison in Curaçao - an establishment which the CPT had visited previously - and to hold consultations with the Netherlands Antilles authorities with a view to establishing a clear timetable for the taking of further measures required. 

                The ad hoc visits to Estonia, Greece and Ukraine were of a follow-up nature, their purpose being to verify whether recommendations made by the CPT during earlier visits as regards specific establishments and/or particular issues had been fully implemented.

                The CPT’s ad hoc visit to Turkey in early 1999 was also in part of a follow-up nature, enabling the Committee to assess the progress made since its periodic visit in October 1997 as regards the treatment and physical conditions of detention of persons deprived of their liberty by the police.  The delegation also visited the prison on the island of Imrali, where it examined the treatment of the establishment's sole inmate, Abdullah Öcalan.

6.             For the most part, cooperation between States and the CPT in the context of visits has been very good at both national and local level.  Awareness of the Committee's mandate is by now fairly widespread in Europe among the officials and staff working in the various categories of establishments where persons may be deprived of their liberty.  Nevertheless, there have been some exceptions to this generally positive situation.

                In particular, delays in getting access to specific establishments are still encountered from time to time, especially as regards law enforcement agencies.  In some recent cases, these difficulties flowed from the fact that the credentials issued to CPT delegations by authorities at national level were disregarded by law enforcement officials.  Steps must be taken to ensure that delegations are issued with credentials which are effective at all levels and vis-à-vis all authorities (including city and regional).

                It should be added that on returning to establishments which have previously been the subject of a visit, CPT delegations still find on occasion that the management of those establishments have received no information concerning the Committee's earlier findings.  Obviously, such a state of affairs is not satisfactory.

Meetings

7.             The CPT held three plenary sessions during 1999, in the course of which 16 visit reports were adopted: on visits to Albania, Croatia, Finland, Ireland, Moldova, the Russian Federation and Spain in 1998, and to Bulgaria, Latvia, Liechtenstein, the Netherlands Antilles, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Turkey and Ukraine in 1999. 

                Frequent recourse is now being had to the expedited procedure for the adoption of visit reports, thereby enabling the Committee to handle an increasing number of reports without any increase in plenary session time.

8.             The practice of organising information seminars in States which are relatively new Parties to the Convention has continued, thereby providing the opportunity for officials to become familiar with the CPT’s working methods and mandate at an early stage. Such seminars were organised in Riga and in St. Petersburg in 1999.  Further, members of the CPT frequently participate in meetings organised by intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations, in order to speak about particular aspects of the Committee's work.

9.             The CPT also intends to pursue the practice of direct, face-to-face discussions between State authorities and representatives of the Committee.  Such discussions might increasingly be organised at the time of forwarding CPT visit reports, in order to facilitate the focussing of attention on the key issues raised in a report, as well as the transmission of information to all relevant government departments.  Discussions of this kind were organised in Sofia during December 1999, in connection with the transmission of the report on the CPT’s visit to Bulgaria earlier that year.

Publications

10.           In the course of 1999, CPT reports on visits to the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany (Frankfurt Airport), Iceland, Ireland, Sweden and Turkey were published at the request of the governments concerned, as well as many interim and follow-up responses of governments.  Specific reference should be made to the publication on 23 February 1999 of the report on the CPT’s periodic visit to Turkey in October 1997, together with the interim response of the Turkish authorities.  This is the first occasion on which the Turkish authorities have authorised the publication of a CPT visit report.  The CPT also welcomes the Turkish Government’s decision to publish the observations made by its delegation after the ad hoc visit to Turkey in 1999.

11.           At the time of writing, 65 of the 98 visit reports drawn up by the CPT have been published.  Many of the remaining 33 visit reports have only recently been forwarded to governments and will in all likelihood be published in due course.  A State-by-State table showing the situation as regards the publication of CPT visit reports is set out in Appendix 2.

12.           Reference should also be made to the recent publication of two books about the CPT, prepared by Austrian and British academics: Folterprävention in Europa (Verlag Österreich), by Ursula Kriebaum, and Protecting Prisoners (Oxford University Press), a collection of essays edited by Rod Morgan and Malcolm Evans. They contain in particular the most comprehensive independent analyses to date of the CPT’s "jurisprudence".

Cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)

13.           In the course of 1999, the ICTY asked whether the CPT would consider accepting the task of monitoring, in certain States, the treatment of persons serving sentences imposed by the Tribunal.  The CPT is honoured that the Tribunal has sought its assistance and, having regard to the great importance of the Tribunal’s work, has decided to respond favourably to its request.  A draft exchange of letters between the Tribunal and the CPT regulating this matter is now close to being finalised.


ORGANISATIONAL ISSUES

The Convention and its Protocols

14.           Ratification of the European Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment is now considered a sine qua non for membership of the Council of Europe.  Consequently, prior to becoming a Member of the Council of Europe in 1999, the Republic of Georgia made a commitment to ratify the Convention within 12 months of its accession to the Organisation.  That commitment was met on 20 June 2000, when Georgia ratified both the Convention and its two Protocols.  As a result, the CPT’s field of operations once again encompasses all member States of the Organisation.

15.           Following ratification of Protocols N° 1 and 2 by Italy on 8 March 1999 and Andorra on 13 July 2000, only two more ratifications (by Croatia and Ukraine) are required for the entry into force of these instruments.

                Protocol N° 1 is of particular interest, as it will make it possible for non-member States of the Council of Europe to be invited by the Committee of Ministers to accede to the Convention.  As the entry into force of the Protocol approaches, it would be useful to reflect upon the use which might be made of this instrument.

16.           Applicant States for membership of the Council of Europe might be invited to accede to the Convention; this would be both a sign of the Organisation’s wish to forge closer links with those countries and a reminder of the obligations which membership of the Council of Europe entails.  Further, when the time is considered ripe from a political standpoint, an invitation to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to accede to the Convention would be visible proof of the Council of Europe’s determination to play a prominent role in this region.  Moreover, it should not be overlooked that certain non-European States which have close links to Europe may also be interested in acceding to the Convention.

                Of course, making use of the possibility offered by Protocol N° 1 will have resource implications. However, non-member States invited to accede to the Convention could be requested to make a financial contribution to the CPT's activities.

CPT membership

17.           Seven new CPT members were elected by the Committee of Ministers in the course of 1999:  Mr Fatmir Braka (in respect of Albania), Mr Yuri Kudryavtsev (Russian Federation), Mr Nikola Matovski (“the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”), Mr Petros Michaelides (Cyprus), Mr Marc Nève (Belgium), Mrs Veronica Pimenoff (Finland) and Ms Maria Teresa Pizarro Beleza (Portugal).  Further, since the beginning of 2000, four more new members have been elected:  Mr Antoni Aleix Camp (in respect of Andorra), Mr Mario Felice (Malta), Mr Eugenijus Gefenas (Lithuania) and Mr Pétur Hauksson (Iceland).

                At the time of publication of this report, the CPT has 36 members.[2]  The seats in respect of Greece, Hungary, Italy and Latvia are currently vacant, and a seat in respect of Georgia will have to be filled as from 1  October 2000.

18.           Following recent elections to the CPT, the number of members with a medical background is no longer on a par with that of lawyers in the Committee.  The CPT trusts that it will be possible gradually to rectify this situation in the course of future elections; in particular, it would be highly desirable to have more forensic doctors in the Committee.  As regards other professional fields, there is now an adequate number of CPT members with specialised practical experience in penitentiary systems; however, the Committee would welcome more members with relevant experience of police work.

                It must also be added that the proportion of women among the CPT’s membership is currently rather low (9 out of 36).

Administrative and financial questions

19.           As was pointed out by the CPT in its last General Report (cf. CPT/Inf (99) 12, paragraphs 18 and 19), the vast expansion of the CPT's field of operations in recent years has not been matched by a corresponding increase in the Committee's resources.  The number of visit days and the level of Secretariat resources identified in the CPT President's letter of 17 June 1996, which set out the projected needs of the Committee in the years to come, are still a considerable way from being reached.  As a result, the CPT's effectiveness is being undermined.

20.           When submitting its budgetary proposals for 2000, the CPT proposed that the number of visit days and the Secretariat's resources be brought up to the necessary levels (i.e. 200 visits days per year and a total staff complement of 23) over the next three years.  As regards more particularly 2000, the CPT requested resources for 15 additional visit days (i.e. to 165 visit days) and a corresponding increase in staff.  These requests were accepted in principle; however, delays in redeploying additional posts to the CPT's Secretariat has meant that the number of visit days in 2000 will in fact remain at the 1999 level of 150.  The CPT very much hopes that it will be in a position to increase the number of visit days to 165 in 2001 and to finally attain the objective of 200 days of visits per year in 2003; however, this is contingent upon additional staff being made available in good time.


WOMEN DEPRIVED OF THEIR LIBERTY

Preliminary remarks

21.           In certain of its previous general reports, the CPT has set out the criteria which guide its work in a variety of places of detention, including police stations, prisons, holding centres for immigration detainees, psychiatric establishments and detention centres for juveniles.[3]

                Naturally, the Committee applies the above-mentioned criteria in respect of both women and men who are deprived of their liberty.  However, in all Council of Europe member States, women inmates represent a comparatively small minority of persons deprived of their liberty.  This can render it very costly for States to make separate provision for women in custody, with the result that they are often held at a small number of locations (on occasion, far from their homes and those of any dependent children), in premises which were originally designed for (and may be shared by) male detainees.  In these circumstances, particular care is required to ensure that women deprived of their liberty are held in a safe and decent custodial environment.

                In order to highlight the importance which it attaches to the prevention of ill-treatment of women deprived of their liberty, the CPT has chosen to devote this chapter of its 10th General Report to describing some of the specific issues which it pursues in this area.  The Committee hopes in this way to give a clear indication to national authorities of its views regarding the manner in which women deprived of their liberty ought to be treated. As in previous years, the CPT would welcome comments on this substantive section of its General Report.

22.           It should be stressed at the outset that the CPT's concerns about the issues identified in this chapter apply irrespective of the nature of the place of detention.  Nevertheless, in the CPT’s experience, risks to the physical and/or psychological integrity of women deprived of their liberty may be greater during the period immediately following apprehension.  Consequently, particular attention should be paid to ensuring that the criteria enunciated in the following sections are respected during that phase.

                The Committee also wishes to emphasise that any standards which it may be developing in this area should be seen as being complementary to those set out in other international instruments, including the European Convention on Human Rights, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the United Nations Body of Principles for the Protection of All Persons Under Any Form of Detention or Imprisonment.

Mixed gender staffing

23.           As the CPT stressed in its 9th General Report, mixed gender staffing is an important safeguard against ill-treatment in places of detention. The presence of male and female staff can have a beneficial effect in terms of both the custodial ethos and in fostering a degree of normality in a place of detention.

                Mixed gender staffing also allows for appropriate staff deployment when carrying out gender sensitive tasks, such as searches. In this context, the CPT wishes again to emphasise that persons deprived of their liberty should only be searched by staff of the same gender and that any search which requires an inmate to undress should be conducted out of the sight of custodial staff of the opposite gender.

Separate accommodation for women deprived of their liberty

24.           The duty of care which is owed by a State to persons deprived of their liberty includes the duty to protect them from others who may wish to cause them harm.  The CPT has occasionally encountered allegations of woman upon woman abuse.  However, allegations of ill-treatment of women in custody by men (and, more particularly, of sexual harassment, including verbal abuse with sexual connotations) arise more frequently, in particular when a State fails to provide separate accommodation for women deprived of their liberty with a preponderance of female staff supervising such accommodation.

As a matter of principle, women deprived of their liberty should be held in accommodation which is physically separate from that occupied by any men being held at the same establishment.  That said, some States have begun to make arrangements for couples (both of whom are deprived of their liberty) to be accommodated together, and/or for some degree of mixed gender association in prisons.  The CPT welcomes such progressive arrangements, provided that the prisoners involved agree to participate, and are carefully selected and adequately supervised.

Equality of access to activities

25.           Women deprived of their liberty should enjoy access to meaningful activities (work, training, education, sport etc.) on an equal footing with their male counterparts. As the Committee mentioned in its last General Report, CPT delegations all too often encounter women inmates being offered activities which have been deemed "appropriate" for them (such as sewing or handicrafts), whilst male prisoners are offered training of a far more vocational nature.

                In the view of the CPT, such a discriminatory approach can only serve to reinforce outmoded stereotypes of the social role of women.  Moreover, depending upon the circumstances, denying women equal access to regime activities could be qualified as degrading treatment.

Ante natal and post natal care

26.           Every effort should be made to meet the specific dietary needs of pregnant women prisoners, who should be offered a high protein diet, rich in fresh fruit and vegetables.

27.           It is axiomatic that babies should not be born in prison, and the usual practice in Council of Europe member States seems to be, at an appropriate moment, to transfer pregnant women prisoners to outside hospitals.

                Nevertheless, from time to time, the CPT encounters examples of pregnant women being shackled or otherwise restrained to beds or other items of furniture during gynaecological examinations and/or delivery.  Such an approach is completely unacceptable, and could certainly be qualified as inhuman and degrading treatment.  Other means of meeting security needs can and should be found.

28.           Many women in prison are primary carers for children or others, whose welfare may be adversely affected by their imprisonment.[4]

                One particularly problematic issue in this context is whether - and, if so, for how long - it should be possible for babies and young children to remain in prison with their mothers.  This is a difficult question to answer given that, on the one hand, prisons clearly do not provide an appropriate environment for babies and young children while, on the other hand, the forcible separation of mothers and infants is highly undesirable.

29.           In the view of the CPT, the governing principle in all cases must be the welfare of the child.  This implies in particular that any ante and post natalcare provided in custody should be equivalent to that available in the outside community.  Where babies and young children are held in custodial settings, their treatment should be supervised by specialists in social work and child development.  The goal should be to produce a child-centred environment, free from the visible trappings of incarceration, such as uniforms and jangling keys.

                Arrangements should also be made to ensure that the movement and cognitive skills of babies held in prison develop normally.  In particular, they should have adequate play and exercise facilities within the prison and, wherever possible, the opportunity to leave the establishment and experience ordinary life outside its walls.

                Facilitating child-minding by family members outside the establishment can also help to ensure that the burden of child-rearing is shared (for example, by the child’s father).  Where this is not possible, consideration should be given to providing access to creche-type facilities.  Such arrangements can enable women prisoners to participate in work and other activities inside the prison to a greater extent than might otherwise be possible.

Hygiene and health issues

30.           The Committee also wishes to call attention to a number of hygiene and health issues in respect of which the needs of women deprived of their liberty differ significantly from those of men.

31.           The specific hygiene needs of women should be addressed in an adequate manner. Ready access to sanitary and washing facilities, safe disposal arrangements for blood-stained articles, as well as provision of hygiene items, such as sanitary towels and tampons, are of particular importance.

                The failure to provide such basic necessities can amount, in itself, to degrading treatment.

32.           It is also essential that the health care provided to persons deprived of their liberty be of a standard equivalent to that enjoyed by patients in the outside community.

                Insofar as women deprived of their liberty are concerned, ensuring that this principle of  equivalence of care is respected will require that health care is provided by medical practitioners and nurses who have specific training in women's health issues, including in gynaecology.

                Moreover, to the extent that preventive health care measures of particular relevance to women, such as screening for breast and cervical cancer, are available in the outside community, they should also be offered to women deprived of their liberty.

                Equivalence of care also requires that a woman's right to bodily integrity should be respected in places of detention as in the outside community.  Thus, where the so-called "morning after" pill and/or other forms of abortion at later stages of a pregnancy are available to women who are free, they should be available under the same conditions to women deprived of their liberty.

33.           As a matter of principle, prisoners who have begun a course of treatment before being incarcerated should be able to continue it once detained.  In this context, efforts should be made to ensure that adequate supplies of specialist medication required by women are available in places of detention.

                As regards, more particularly, the contraceptive pill, it should be recalled that this medication may be prescribed for medical reasons other than preventing conception (e.g. to alleviate painful menstruation).  The fact that a woman's incarceration may - in itself - greatly diminish the likelihood of conception while detained is not a sufficient reason to withhold such medication.


APPENDIX 1

A.      Signatures and ratifications of the
European Convention for the Prevention of Torture
and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
(*)

(as at 15 August 2000)

 

Member States

Date of

signature

Date of

ratification

Date of entry

into force

Albania

02.10.96

02.10.96

01.02.97

Andorra

10.09.96

06.01.97

01.05.97

Austria

26.11.87

06.01.89

01.05.89

Belgium

26.11.87

23.07.91

01.11.91

Bulgaria

30.09.93

03.05.94

01.09.94

Croatia

06.11.96

11.10.97

01.02.98

Cyprus

26.11.87

03.04.89

01.08.89

Czech Republic

23.12.92

07.09.95

01.01.96

Denmark

26.11.87

02.05.89

01.09.89

Estonia

28.06.96

06.11.96

01.03.97

Finland

16.11.89

20.12.90

01.04.91

France

26.11.87

09.01.89

01.05.89

Georgia

16.02.00

20.06.00

01.10.00

Germany

26.11.87

21.02.90

01.06.90

Greece

26.11.87

02.08.91

01.12.91

Hungary

09.02.93

04.11.93

01.03.94

Iceland

26.11.87

19.06.90

01.10.90

Ireland

14.03.88

14.03.88

01.02.89

Italy

26.11.87

29.12.88

01.04.89

Latvia

11.09.97

10.02.98

01.06.98

Liechtenstein

26.11.87

12.09.91

01.01.92

Lithuania

14.09.95

26.11.98

01.03.99

Luxembourg

26.11.87

06.09.88

01.02.89

Malta

26.11.87

07.03.88

01.02.89

Moldova

02.05.96

02.10.97

01.02.98

Netherlands

26.11.87

12.10.88

01.02.89

Norway

26.11.87

21.04.89

01.08.89

Poland

11.07.94

10.10.94

01.02.95

Portugal

26.11.87

29.03.90

01.07.90

Romania

04.11.93

04.10.94

01.02.95

Russian Federation

28.02.96

05.05.98

01.09.98

San Marino

16.11.89

31.01.90

01.05.90

Slovakia

23.12.92

11.05.94

01.09.94

Slovenia

04.11.93

02.02.94

01.06.94

Spain

26.11.87

02.05.89

01.09.89

Sweden

26.11.87

21.06.88

01.02.89

Switzerland

26.11.87

07.10.88

01.02.89

"The former Yugoslav

Republic of Macedonia"

14.06.96

06.06.97

01.10.97

Turkey

11.01.88

26.02.88

01.02.89

Ukraine

02.05.96

05.05.97

01.09.97

United Kingdom

26.11.87

24.06.88

01.02.89

_____________

*              The Convention is open for signature by the member States of the Council of Europe.


B.      The CPT's field of operations

Situation as at 15 August 2000

cptmap2000.gif (107885 bytes)

Note: This is an unofficial representation of States bound by the Convention.

For technical reasons it has not been possible to show the entire territory of certain of the States concerned.

 

States bound by the Convention

Prison population *

41 States

1 867 051 prisoners

-            Albania

-            Andorra

-            Austria

-            Belgium

-            Bulgaria

-            Croatia

-            Cyprus

-            Czech Republic

-            Denmark

-            Estonia

-            Finland

-            France

-            Georgia

-            Germany

-            Greece

-            Hungary

-            Iceland

-            Ireland

-            Italy

-            Latvia

-            Liechtenstein

-            Lithuania

-            Luxembourg

-            Malta

-            Moldova

-            Netherlands

-            Norway

-            Poland

-            Portugal

-            Romania

-            Russian Federation

-            San Marino

-            Slovakia

-            Slovenia

-            Spain

-            Sweden

-            Switzerland

-            "The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia"

-            Turkey

-            Ukraine

-            United Kingdom

(Main source:

Council of Europe Annual Penal Statistics (SPACE 1998); data for most States as at 1 September 1998.)

* It should be noted that the CPT's mandate covers also all other categories of places where persons are deprived of their liberty by a public authority:

-             police establishments,

-             detention centres for juveniles,

-             military detention facilities,

-             holding centres for aliens,

-             psychiatric hospitals

etc.

     

C.      Signatures and ratifications of Protocols Nos. 1 and 2
to the European Convention for the Prevention of Torture
and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

(as at 15 August 2000)

 

Protocol No. 1

Protocol No. 2

Member States

Date of
signature

Date of
ratification

Date of entry
into force

Date of
signature

Date of
ratification

Date of entry
into force

Albania

02.10.96

02.10.96

 

02.10.96

02.10.96

 

Andorra

04.11.99

13.07.00

 

04.11.99

13.07.00

 

Austria

04.11.93

30.04.96

 

04.11.93

30.04.96

 

Belgium

04.11.93

12.09.96

 

04.11.93

12.09.96

 

Bulgaria

04.03.97

27.10.97

 

04.03.97

27.10.97

 

Croatia

10.05.00

***

 

10.05.00

***

 

Cyprus

02.02.94

10.09.97

 

02.02.94

10.09.97

 

Czech Republic

28.04.95

07.09.95

 

28.04.95

07.09.95

 

Denmark

04.11.93

26.04.94

 

04.11.93

26.04.94

 

Estonia

28.06.96

06.11.96

 

28.06.96

06.11.96

 

Finland

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

France

04.11.93

19.08.98

 

04.11.93

14.08.96

 

Georgia

16.02.00

20.06.00

 

16.02.00

20.06.00

 

Germany

04.11.93

13.12.96

 

04.11.93

13.12.96

 

Greece

04.11.93

29.06.94

 

04.11.93

29.06.94

 

Hungary

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

Iceland

08.09.94

29.06.95

 

08.09.94

29.06.95

 

Ireland

   10.04.96 *

   10.04.96 *

 

   10.04.96 *

   10.04.96 *

 

Italy

30.10.96

08.03.99

 

30.10.96

08.03.99

 

Latvia

11.09.97

10.02.98

 

11.09.97

10.02.98

 

Liechtenstein

04.11.93

05.05.95

 

04.11.93

05.05.95

 

Lithuania

14.09.95

26.11.98

 

14.09.95

26.11.98

 

Luxembourg

04.11.93

20.07.95

 

04.11.93

20.07.95

 

Malta

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

Moldova

02.10.97

02.10.97

 

02.10.97

02.10.97

 

Netherlands

05.05.94

23.02.95

 

05.05.94

23.02.95

 

Norway

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

   04.11.93 *

   04.11.93 *

 

Poland

11.01.95

24.03.95

 

11.01.95

24.03.95

 

Portugal

03.06.94

20.03.98

 

03.06.94

03.02.00

 

Romania

04.11.93

04.10.94

 

04.11.93

04.10.94

 

Russian Federation

28.02.96

05.05.98

 

28.02.96

05.05.98

 

San Marino

04.11.93

05.12.96

 

04.11.93

05.12.96

 

Slovakia

07.03.94

11.05.94

 

07.03.94

11.05.94

 

Slovenia

31.03.94

16.02.95

 

31.03.94

16.02.95

 

Spain

21.02.95

08.06.95

 

21.02.95

08.06.95

 

Sweden

   07.03.94 *

   07.03.94 *

 

   07.03.94 *

   07.03.94 *

 

Switzerland

   09.03.94 *

   09.03.94 *

 

   09.03.94 *

   09.03.94 *

 

"The former Yugoslav

Republic of Macedonia"

14.06.96

06.06.97

 

14.06.96

06.06.97

 

Turkey

10.05.95

17.09.97

 

10.05.95

17.09.97

 

Ukraine

26.01.98

***

 

26.01.98

***

 

United Kingdom

09.12.93

11.04.96

 

09.12.93

11.04.96

 

_____________

*              Signature without reservation as to ratification.

***         State whose ratification is necessary for the entry into force of the Protocol.


APPENDIX 2

State-by-State table showing the number of visits by the CPT,
visit reports sent to Governments and reports published

(as at 15 August 2000)

Member States

Number of visits

Number of reports submitted

Number of reports published

Albania

2

2

0

Andorra

1

1

1

Austria

3

3

2

Belgium

2

2

2

Bulgaria

2

2

1

Croatia

1

1

0

Cyprus

3

2

2

Czech Republic

1

1

1

Denmark

2

2

2

Estonia

2

2

0

Finland

2

2

2

France

5

4

4

Georgia

-

-

-

Germany

3

3

3

Greece

4

4

1

Hungary

2

2

1

Iceland

2

2

2

Ireland

2

2

2

Italy

4

3

2

Latvia

1

1

0

Liechtenstein

2

2

1

Lithuania

1

1

0

Luxembourg

2

2

2

Malta

2

2

2

Moldova

1

1

0

Netherlands

5

5

5

Norway

3

3

3

Poland

2

1

1

Portugal

4

4

3

Romania

2

2

1

Russian Federation

4

   3 *

0

San Marino

2

2

1

Slovakia

1

1

1

Slovenia

1

1

1

Spain

6

6

6

Sweden

3

3

3

Switzerland

2

2

2

"The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia"

1

1

0

Turkey

9

8

1

Ukraine

2

2

0

United Kingdom

5

5

4

_____________

*              Covering the four visits


APPENDIX 3

A.      Members of the CPT

(listed in order of precedence - as at 15 August 2000 *)

Name

 

Term of office expires

Ms Silvia CASALE,
President

British

18.12.2001

Mrs Ingrid LYCKE ELLINGSEN,
1st Vice-President

Norwegian

20.09.2001

Mr Volodymyr YEVINTOV,
2nd Vice-President

Ukrainian

08.09.2002

Mr Arnold OEHRY

Liechtensteiner

13.01.2001

Mr Leopoldo TORRES BOURSAULT

Spanish

03.05.2001

Mr Safa REISOGLU

Turkish

20.09.2001

Mr Ivan ZAKINE

French

20.09.2001

Mrs Gisela PERREN-KLINGLER

Swiss

20.09.2001

Mr John OLDEN

Irish

21.03.2003

Mr Florin STANESCU

Romanian

21.03.2003

Mr Mario BENEDETTINI

San Marinese

21.03.2003

Mrs Jagoda POLONCOVÁ

Slovakian

21.06.2003

Mrs Christina DOCTARE

Swedish

19.09.2003

Mr Adam LAPTAŠ

Polish

30.11.2003

Mr Zdenek HÁJEK

Czech

11.09.2000

Mrs Emilia DRUMEVA

Bulgarian

17.03.2001

Mr Pieter Reinhard STOFFELEN

Dutch

20.09.2001

Mr Ole Vedel RASMUSSEN

Danish

20.09.2001

Mrs Renate KICKER

Austrian

20.09.2001

Mr Pierre SCHMIT

Luxemburger

20.09.2001

Mr Andres LEHTMETS

Estonian

18.12.2001

Mr Davor STRINOVIC

Croatian

04.06.2002

Mr Aurel KISTRUGA

Moldovan

04.06.2002

Mr Rudolf SCHMUCK

German

08.09.2002

Mr Aleš BUTALA

Slovenian

09.11.2002

Mr Yuri KUDRYAVTSEV

Russian

12.01.2003

Mrs Veronica PIMENOFF

Finnish

28.07.2003

Ms Maria Teresa PIZARRO BELEZA

Portuguese

28.07.2003

Mr Fatmir BRAKA

Albanian

28.07.2003

Mr Nikola MATOVSKI

citizen of "the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia"

16.11.2003

Mr Petros MICHAELIDES

Cypriot

30.11.2003

Mr Marc NÈVE

Belgian

08.01.2004

Mr Eugenijus GEFENAS

Lithuanian

16.02.2004

Mr Antoni ALEIX CAMP

Andorran

30.03.2004

Mr Mario FELICE

Maltese

25.04.2004

Mr Pétur HAUKSSON

Icelander

18.07.2004

____________

*     At this date, the seats in respect of Greece, Hungary, Italy and Latvia were vacant.


B.      Secretariat of the CPT

(as at 15 August 2000)

Mr Trevor STEVENS

Executive Secretary

Mrs Geneviève MAYER

Deputy Executive Secretary

            Secretariat:       Mrs Janey MASLEN
                                    Ms Antonella NASTASIE

 

Central section

 

Mrs Florence CALLOT

Administrative, budgetary and staff questions

Mr Patrick MÜLLER

Head of the documentation and information centre

Ms Mireille MONTI

Archives and publications

 

Units responsible for visits

 

Unit 1

Mrs Geneviève MAYER, Head of Unit

Mr Edo KORLJAN

Mr Michael NEURAUTER

            Secretariat:       Ms Antonella NASTASIE

 

Unit 2

Mr Fabrice KELLENS, Head of Unit

Mrs Petya NESTOROVA

Mr Borys WÓDZ

            Secretariat:       Ms Olga SOKOL

 

Unit 3

Mr Mark KELLY, Head of Unit

Mr Jan MALINOWSKI

Ms Bojana URUMOVA

            Secretariat:       Ms Nadine SCHAEFFER


APPENDIX 4

Places of detention visited by CPT delegations in 1999

I.          Periodic visits

A.   Austria (19 to 30 September)

 

Police and Gendarmerie establishments

Graz and surrounding area

-       Graz Police Jail

-       Police station at Graz Railway Station

-       Gendarmerie Stations in Rehnitz, Oberpullendorf and Oberwart

Leoben

-       Police Jail

Vienna

-       Security Bureau of the 2nd Division of the Criminal Investigation Department of the Federal Directorate of the Vienna Police

-       Neubau Police Station, Kandelgasse (7th District)

-       Favoriten Police Station, Van-der-Nüll-Gasse (10th District)

-       Brigittenau Police Station, Pappenheimgasse (20th District)

-       Police Jails at Rossauer Lände and Hernalser Gürtel

-       Wien-Schwechat Airport transit zone and special transit zone

 

Prisons

-       Göllersdorf Prison

-       Schwarzau Prison

-       Wien-Josefstadt Prison, Vienna

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Vienna Psychiatric Hospital (in particular Pavilion 23 for persons placed in the context of criminal proceedings), Baumgartner Höhe

 

B.   Bulgaria (25 April to 7 May)

 

Police establishments

-       4th District Police Directorate, Burgas

-       6th District Police Directorate, Plovdiv

-       3rd District Police Directorate, Sofia

-       Regional Directorate of Internal Affairs, Stara Zagora

-       Gladstone Street Police Station, Pleven

-       Home for the temporary placement of adults, Plovdiv

-       Home for the temporary placement of adults, Sofia

-       Home for the temporary placement of minors, Plovdiv

 

Investigation detention facilities

-       Central Investigation detention facilities, Blvd. G.M. Dimitrov, 42, Sofia

-       Investigation detention facilities, Razvigor Street, 1, Sofia

-       3rd District Investigation detention facilities, Sofia

-       Regional Investigation detention facilities, Burgas

-       Regional Investigation detention facilities, Pleven

-       Regional Investigation detention facilities, Plovdiv

-       Regional Investigation detention facilities, Stara Zagora

-       Investigation detention facilities "Slunchev Bryag", Nessebur

 

Prisons

-       Burgas Prison

-       Stara Zagora Prison

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Lovech State Psychiatric Hospital (closed ward for the criminally irresponsible)

-       Lovech Prison Hospital (psychiatric section)

-       Social welfare home for male residents with mental disorders, Terter

 

Other establishments

-       Hotel for unwanted passengers at Sofia Airport

 

C.   Hungary (5 to 16 December)

 

Police and Border Guard establishments

-       Police central holding facility, Budapest

-       5th and 8th District Police Stations, Budapest

-       Regional Police Detention Facility, Debrecen

-       Budai Street Police Station, Debrecen

-       Hajduhadhaz Police Station (Hajdu-Bihar County)

-       Regional Police Detention Facility, Veszprem

-       Holding Facility for Aliens (transit area), Budapest International Airport

-       Community Shelter for Aliens, Budapest International Airport

-       Community Shelter for Aliens, Nyarbator

 

Prisons

-       Budapest Remand Prison

-       Tokol Prisons (Establishment for juveniles and Unit for HIV+ prisoners)

-       Veszprem Prison

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Balassagyarrmat General Hospital (Psychiatric Departments I & II)

-       Care Home for psychiatric patients, Ludanyhalaszi

 

Military detention facilities

-       Military Prison, Budapest

 

D.   Latvia (24 January - 3 February)

 

Police establishments

Riga

-       Gogola and Matisa Street Police Stations

-       General Police Board Detention Facility, Aspazijas Street

-       Police Sobering-up Centre, Pupolu Street

-       Illegal Immigrant and other Unidentified Persons Accommodation Centre, Gaizina Street

-       Preventive Care Centre for Minors, Alises Street

-       Pre-Trial Investigation Centre and Short-Term Detention Isolator, Brivibas Street

 

Prisons

-       Central Prison, Riga

-       Ilguciema Prison

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Riga

 

Establishments for young offenders

-       Naukseni Educational and Correctional Institution for girls

 

Military detention facilities

-       Riga Garrison Detention Facility

 

E.    Liechtenstein (31 May to 2 June)

 

-       Vaduz Police Station

-       Vaduz Prison

 

F.    Norway (13 to 23 September)

 

Police establishments

Asker and Bærum Police District

-       Police Headquarters, Sandvika

Bergen Police District

-       Police Headquarters

-       Nesttun Police Station

-       Ulset Police Station

-       Fana District Sheriff's Office

-       Laksevåg District Sheriff's Office

Oslo Police District

-       Police Headquarters

-       Majorstuen Police Station

-       Manglerud Police Station

Romerike Police District

-       Gardermoen Police Station, Oslo International Airport

 

Holding Centres for Aliens

-       Snarøya Aliens Holding Centre

 

Prisons

-       Bergen Prison (Landsfengsel)

-       Oslo Prison (Kretsfengsel)

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Dikemark Hospital

-       Aker Hospital, Oslo

-       Gaustad Hospital, Oslo

 

Establishments for young persons

-       BUS Observation Institution, Oslo

-       Øvstun Centre, Nesttun

-       Fossum Collective, Spydeberg

 

G.   Portugal (19 to 30 April)

 

Law enforcement agencies

Judicial Police

-       Headquarters at Rua Venâncio Rodrigues, Coimbra

Public Security Police

-       Headquarters at Praça Marquês de Pombal, Aveiro

-       Headquarters at Rua Olímpio Nicolau Rui Fernandes, Coimbra

-       Headquarters at Largo de São Pedro, Leiria

-       Headquarters at Avenida Luisa Tódy, Setúbal

-       Holding facilities at Rua Capelo (Governo Civil), Lisbon

-       Holding facilities at Quartel da Bela Vista, Rua Monte Aventino, Oporto

-       Police Station at Largo do Calvário, Lisbon

-       Police Station at Rua de Naulila, Antas, Oporto

National Republican Guard

-       Headquarters at Avenida Dias da Silva, Coimbra

-       Headquarters at Largo de Santo Estevão, Leiria

-       Headquarters at Avenida Jaime Cortesão, Setúbal

Foreigners and Border Police

-       Temporary holding facilities at Lisbon Airport

 

Prisons

-       Coimbra Regional Prison (including the detention facility at the Judicial Police Headquarters)

-       Leiria Special Prison

-       Lisbon Central Prison

-       Oporto Central Prison

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Sobral Cid Hospital, Coimbra

 

H.   Romania (24 January to 5 February)

 

Police establishments

Brasov

-       County Police Headquarters

Bucharest

-       General Directorate of the Bucharest Municipal Police

-       Police Divisions N° 5, 6, 7 and 8

-       Holding Area for foreigners at Bucharest-Otopeni international airport

-       Otopeni Holding Centre for foreigners

Craiova

-       County and Municipal Police Headquarters

Giurgiu

-       Holding Camp for foreigners

Slatina

-       County Police Headquarters

 

Prisons

-       Bucharest-Jilava Prison and Bucharest Prison Hospital

-       Codlea Prison

-       Craiova Prison

-       Gaiesti Re-education Centre for minors

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Poiana Mare Psychiatric Hospital, Dolj County

 

I.     Russian Federation
(30 August to 15 September)

 

Police establishments

Chelyabinsk

-       Leninskoe District Command of Internal Affairs

-       Traktozavodskyi District Command of Internal Affairs

-       Directorate for Combating Organised Crime (UBOP)

St.Petersburg

-       Temporary holding facility (IVS) at St.Petersburg City Command of Internal Affairs

-       Petrogradski District Command of Internal Affairs

-       Primorski District Command of Internal Affairs

-       35th Militia Division, Primorskyi District

-       52nd Militia Division, Krasnogvardeiskyi District

-       Joint reception and distribution centre at St.Petersburg City Command of Internal Affairs

Vologda

-       City Command of Internal Affairs

-       City Sobering-up Centre

-       Reception and distribution centre for minors (Gorki Street)

-       Joint reception and distribution centre (Leningradskaya Street)

 

Prisons

Chelyabinsk Region

-       Medical-correctional establishment (LIU) No 3, Chelyabinsk

-       Prison No 2, Zlatoust

-       Strict regime colony No 2, Chelyabinsk

St.Petersburg City and Leningrad Region

-       Educational colony for juveniles, Kolpino

-       Pre-trial establishment (SIZO) No 1 (“Kresty”),  St.Petersburg

Vologda Region

-       Colony No 5 for prisoners serving life sentences, Novozero

-       Inter-regional hospital (LPU) No 10, Vologda

-       Prison No 1, Vologda

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Special psychiatric hospital with intensive supervision, St.Petersburg

-       Forensic psychiatric ward of the Territorial Psychiatric Board No 2, St.Petersburg

 

J.    San Marino (9 to 11 June)

 

Police and Gendarmerie establishments

-       Police Headquarters

-       Police Station, Dogana

-       Gendarmerie Headquarters

-       Rock’s Guard Station, Dogana

 

Prisons

-       San Marino Prison

 

Psychiatric establishments

-       Neuro-Psychiatric Department of the San Marino Civil Hospital

 

Establishments for young persons

-       Centre for minors (“Casa Famiglia”)

 

K.   United Kingdom (Northern Ireland)
(29 November to 8 December)

 

Police establishments

-       Castlereagh Holding Centre, Belfast

-       Gough Barracks Holding Centre, Armagh

-       Musgrave Street Police Station, Belfast

 

Prisons

-       Maghaberry Prison

-       Magilligan Prison

 

Establishments for young offenders

-       Lisnevin Juvenile Justice Centre

-       Rathgael Juvenile Justice Centre

 

 

II.         Ad hoc visits

 

A.   Estonia (15 to 21 December)

 

Police establishments

-       Ida-Viru Police District Arrest House, Kohtla-Järve

-       Laane-Viru Police District Arrest House, Rakvere

-       Narva Police District Arrest House

-       Tallinn Police District Arrest House No 1

-       New Arrest House facility, Tallinn

-       Tartu Police District Arrest House

-       Viljandi Police District Arrest House

-       Regional Office of the Security Police, Kohtla-Järve

-       Headquarters of the Central Criminal Police, Tallinn

-       Police Headquarters, Tartu

 

Prisons

- Viljandi Juvenile Prison

 

Psychiatric establishments

- Valkla Social Welfare House, Kiiu

 

B.   Greece (26 October to 2 November)

 

Police establishments

Attica Prefecture

-       Attica General Police Directorate, Athens (Alexandras Avenue)

-       Drapetzona Police Station, Piraeus (Socratous Street)

-       Glyfada Police Station (Dousmanis Street)

-       Kolonos Police Station, Athens (Laodamantos Street)

-       Omonia Police Station, Athens (Socratous Street)

-       Police Station at Athens Airport, East Terminal

-       Holding areas for foreigners at Athens Airport, East Terminal

-       Piraeus Holding Centre for Aliens (Asklepiou Street)

-       Athens Transfer Centre for prisoners (Kavafi Street)

-       Piraeus Transfer Centre for prisoners (Notara Street)

Evros Prefecture

-       Alexandroupolis Police Station and Police Directorate

-       Transitional Detachment holding facility for illegal aliens, Feres

 

Prisons

-       Korydallos Prison Complex

 

Establishments for young offenders

-       Institution for Male Juvenile Offenders, Avlona

 

C.   Netherlands (Antilles) (25 to 29 January)

 

Prisons

-       Koraal Specht Prison

 

D.   Turkey (28 February to 3 March)

Police establishments

Istanbul

-       Istanbul Police Headquarters:

·        Anti-Terror Department

·        Foreigners Department

·        Department for the Prevention of Smuggling and Organised Crime (Financial Crime, Narcotics and Organised Crime Sections)

-       Istanbul Airport Police Station

-       Passport Police Detention Area at Istanbul International Airport

-       Eyüp District Police Headquarters

-       Eyüp District Central Police Station

-       Law and Order Department, Eyüp District

-       Içerenköy Police Station

Izmir

-       Anti-Terror Department, Izmir Police Headquarters

 

Prisons

-       prison on the island of Imrali

 

E.    Ukraine (15 to 23 July)

 

Police establishments

Kharkiv

-       Dzerzhynski District Command of Internal Affairs

Kyiv

-       Leningradskyi District Command of Internal Affairs

-       Moskovskyi District Command of Internal Affairs

-       Podilskyi District Command of Internal Affairs

-       Central Railway Station Division of Transport Militia

-       Transport Militia holding facility for criminal suspects and Centre for the reception and allocation of vagrants, Central Railway Station

-       Militia Central Holding facility (ITT)

-       Central Department for the fight against organised crime

 

Prisons

-       Colony n° 85, Boutcha

-       Pre-trial Prison No. 313/203, Kharkiv


[1]              Another milestone was reached on 20 April 2000 with the beginning of the 100th visit of the CPT, to the North Caucasian region of the Russian Federation.

[2]               See Appendix 2 A for the full list of CPT members.  Abridged curricula vitae of the members can be obtained from the CPT’s Secretariat and are posted on its website (http://www.cpt.coe.int).

[3]              Police custody and imprisonment, cf. the 2nd General Report (CPT/Inf (92) 3), paragraphs 35 to 60;

Health care services in prisons, cf. the 3rd General Report (CPT/Inf (93) 12), paragraphs 30 to 77;

Foreign nationals detained under aliens legislation, cf. the 7th General Report (CPT/Inf (97) 10), paragraphs 24 to 36;

Involuntary placement in psychiatric establishments, cf. the 8th General Report (CPT/Inf (98) 12), paragraphs 25 to 55;

Juveniles deprived of their liberty, cf. the 9th General Report (CPT/Inf (99) 12), paragraphs 20 to 41.

[4]           Cf. also Recommendation 1469 (2000) of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe on the subject of mothers and babies in prison.


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